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September 24 2015

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humansofnewyork:

“I was a maître d’ at a restaurant for thirteen years. But one week I got a really bad case of pneumonia that put me in the hospital. While I was lying in that hospital bed, I was thinking about how I really didn’t want to go back to work. Then that motivational speaker came on TV. You know– the one that has all those teeth in his mouth. And he said: ‘Think back to what made you happy when you were young! That’s what you should be doing!’ Well I grew up in the country, and I always had a lot of dogs, so I thought that nothing would make me happier than to be a dog walker. But I knew I needed to distinguish myself. So I decided to make a uniform. I smoked a joint and came up with this outfit. I wanted people to look at me and think: ‘If this man is walking our dog, and there’s some sort of major disaster, he’s going to survive. He’s going to fish for those dogs. He’s going to build a bunker and shelter those dogs until it’s safe to bring them home.’ After I finished the design, I got four of my friends to wear the uniform, and we borrowed all the neighbors’ dogs, and we walked them down 5th avenue while handing out business cards. I got five customers that first day.” 

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lonequixote:

Butterflies and Poppies by Vincent van Gogh

(via @lonequixote)

Not only is small talk painfully boring in real life, it also makes for terrible dialogue.
Caitlin Durante
(via thatlitsite)
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kuplenko:

Kuplenko

Seeing is believing

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kuplenko:

Kuplenko

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archatlas:

Villa B Tectoniques Architectes

Built near Lyon, this house is simple, compact, and very energy efficient. It is built in wood, with a high-performance envelope, triple glazing, a planted roof. The double flow ventilation is supplied by an air ground heat exchanger. Heating is provided by gas combination boiler - Solar + wood stove in extra

Images and text via Tectoniques Architectes .

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queerlypsychoticsiriusblack:

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.

The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”

You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.

(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

[words that read “This certificate certifies that the bearer has permission to make as much really terrible bad art as they need to make and it’ll be okay” are at the top of the image. below is a sketch of an official seal with the words “super official seal of officialness” and a small furry animal wearing a sleeveless black top with the words “art is hard” that is holding a pencil. the animal is saying “i have a hugo award and make a living drawing stuff, and i say it’s cool!”.]

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kuplenko:

Kuplenko

Fragmented

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godfearingfeminist:

sandookchi:

Zohra Sehgal, a South Asian actress par excellence, actually spoke multiple languages including Urdu, Hindi, English and German. She is one of the earliest international actresses who came from an aristocratic Muslim family in India. When her father insisted that she get married, she outright said, ‘I don’t want to get married,’  and announced that she might become a pilot. In 1917 she went to a boarding school in Lahore, after which, in 1930, she donned a burqa and set off for Europe by road — crossing Iran, Syria, Palestine and Egypt. She trained as a ballet dancer in Germany. Zohra was quite blunt when it came to expressing her opinions. She was an agnostic and defied all the stereotypes about a “Muslim girl from a traditional family”. She was unbelievably bold and confident and was known for her mischievous humor. She earned immense respect in British TV at a time when people were not accepting of ‘diversity’ and even the Asian roles were played by white people. When she had first arrived in Britain, “it was such that if we were sitting in the bus, the British did not sit next to us. Unconsciously in the minds of white people, there was a hesitation”. She defied cultural norms once more when she married her Hindu student eight years younger than her. She never felt welcomed in Lahore, so she left half her family in Pakistan after 1947 Partition and settled in Delhi where she taught a theater group. She raised her children on her own when her husband committed suicide at a young age. She was literally unstoppable and appeared consistently in British TV series like The Jewel in Crown, Mind Your Language and Doctor Who. She has acted in myriad Bollywood films and performed across Japan, Egypt, Europe and the US. She was a classical dancer, choreographer, cinema, theater and television actress whose career spanned over 8 decades. She was awarded Padma Shri and Padma Vibhushan, some of the highest civilian honors in India. She was a fighter all her life, she even defeated cancer. On her 100th birthday she said, “I want an electric cremation. I don’t want any poems and fuss after that. And for heaven’s sake don’t bring back the ashes. Flush them down the toilet if the crematorium refuses to keep them. If they tell you that I am dead, I want you to give a big laugh". Zohra aapa lived the life of a grand diva and passed away in 2014 at the age of 102.

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“Oh, my burqa was of lovely silk and I was so glad I made petticoats out of it!”

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Zohra with her husband Kameshwar Sehgal in 1945.

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“What actually makes brings out your beauty is the radiance of being content and you can only be content when you are employed in something you love.”

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“You see me now when I am old and ugly, in fact you should have seen me earlier — when I was young and ugly!”

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Zohra at her 100th birthday was quietly humming “Abhi To Main Jawan Hoon” (I am still young) by poet Hafeez Jullundhri, as she attacked the huge cake.

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“Life’s been tough but I’ve been tougher. I beat life at its own game”

She was in one of my favorite Bollywood movies, had no idea how bad ass this woman was…whoa!

kyi-solo:

shinykari:

madmaudlingoes:

bropakpro:

touch-my-cuboner:

zecretary:

zecretary:

the stereotype that women talk more than men is infinitely amusing to me because men are literally incapable of shutting the fuck up

i hope this post gets popular enough that i hurt a man’s feelings

It’s not a stereotype it’s a proven fact you femanazi piece of shit.

lmao there it is 

You wanna talk proven facts? This shit’s been done, son: researcher Dale Spencer in Australia used audio and video tape to independently evaluate who talked the most in mixed-gender university classroom discussions. Regardless of the gender ratio of the students, whether the instructor was deliberately trying to encourage female participation or not, men always talked more—whether the metric was minutes of talking or number of words spoken. 

Moreover, men literally have no clue how much they talk. When Spencer asked students to evaluate their perception of who talked more in a given discussion, women were pretty accurate; but men perceived the discussion as being “equal” when women talked only 15% of the time, and the discussion as being dominated by women if they talked only 30% of the time.

Spencer’s conclusion, if I may parahprase: you only think we talk too much because you’d rather we were silent.

Don’t fuck with me, asshole, I’m a scientist.

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Well fuck

This makes me laugh. I worked in a male dominated field. By male dominated I mean that about about 10% of the workforce was female. And the things I noticed. Not only do men talk a lot, they gossip worse than most women I’ve ever met. And nosy? Extremely.

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art-and-things-of-beauty:

Antoine Chintreuil (1814-1873) -  Study of birch, oil on paper, 34,5 x 27 cm.

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seeliequeene:

Santa Casilda (detail) Francisco de Zubaran, 1630

So detailed, so pretty.

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doppelgender:

got banned from my last dungeons & dragons campaign for insisting that paladin was pronounced like paula deen

Best thing of the day.

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